Report on plans and priorities 2016-2017

ISSN 2292-4760

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Table of Contents

Minister’s Message

Commissioner’s Message

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

Organizational Profile

Organizational Context

Planned Expenditures

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Frameworks

Departmental Spending Trend

Estimates by Vote

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Canadian stories and perspectives are reflected in audiovisual media and accessible to Canadians and the world

Program 1.1: Audiovisual Production

Program 1.2: Accessibility and Audience Engagement Program

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Conservation and Preservation

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Consumer Access and Engagement

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Educational and institutional access and engagement

Sub-Program 1.2.4: National and International Industry Outreach

Internal Services

Section III: Supplementary Information

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

Supplementary Information Tables

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

Appendix: Definitions

Endnotes

 

Minister’s Message

Mélanie Joly Every year, the organizations in the Canadian Heritage Portfolio highlight the talent of Canadian creators, as well as the diversity of our culture and of our artistic, historical and documentary heritage. These organizations, including the National Film Board (NFB), demonstrate innovation as they pursue their mandate and, in so doing, help the government achieve its priorities and promote our two official languages. They also contribute to the success of the digital shift in a diverse array of projects, while reaffirming our values of openness and respect in all their activities.

For more than 75 years, the NFB has played a unique role as a public producer and distributor of audiovisual works that present an authentically Canadian point of view and reflect the country’s linguistic and cultural diversity. By producing cutting-edge works that focus on creativity and innovation, the NFB has positioned itself as a leader in documentary, animated and interactive productions. 2017, which will mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation, will be an opportunity for the NFB to highlight Canada’s audiovisual heritage. To do this, the NFB will make innovation key to its activities by expanding its offer and digital tools and exploring other production formats. Having a presence in Canadian society and interacting with Canadians will remain among its top priorities.

As Minister of Canadian Heritage, I am pleased to present the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities prepared by the NFB. I encourage you to take a look at this report for an overview of the activities and responsibilities of the NFB in the coming year.

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

A Note on the 2016—17 Report on Plans and Priorities

The 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities of the National Film Board (NFB) provides information on how it will support the Government in achieving our agenda in the coming year. I am fully confident that the NFB is prepared to successfully support me and work with our partners inside and outside government to deliver for Canadians. However, given our commitment to more effective reporting, this year’s report will be the final submission using the existing reporting framework.

The Prime Minister and the President of the Treasury Board are working to develop new, simplified and more effective reporting processes that will better allow Parliament and Canadians to monitor our Government’s progress on delivering real change to Canadians. In the future, the NFB’s report to Parliament will focus to be more transparent on how we are using our resources to fulfill our commitments and achieve results for Canadians.

These new reporting mechanisms will allow Canadians to more easily follow the NFB’s progress towards delivering on our priorities, which were outlined in the Prime Minister’s mandate letter to me.

The Honourable Mélanie Joly

In order to continue to provide a relevant vision of the country’s cultural diversity to Canadians and the rest of the world, it is important to reach out to creators in Canada’s various communities to reflect a diversity of viewpoints, realities and perspectives. To achieve this, the NFB will continue to work in both official languages and maintain its engagement with francophone and anglophone minority communities by implementing its new 2016‒2018 official languages action plan. Also, as a leader in the production of works by Indigenous artists and filmmakers, the NFB intends to help promote the renewal of Indigenous cultural expression and highlight the contribution of Indigenous people to Canada’s audiovisual heritage.

 

Commissioner’s Message

Claude Jolicoeur As 2016‒2017 begins, the NFB remains boldly and ambitiously focused on the future, even as it determines the direction it will be taking in the coming year. Whether it be its ongoing role as a global leader in creation and innovation, placing audiences at the heart of its activities, or pursuing the development of digital platforms, the NFB’s priorities are clear, and work is already underway.

The work that the NFB accomplishes in terms of programming—producing auteur social-issue documentaries, innovative interactive works, animated films and immersive experiences—demonstrates that as a public producer, we have always succeeded in reinventing ourselves in order to remain engaging and relevant to Canadians. Nonetheless, we can go even further, and the upcoming year will be an opportunity to explore new ways of creating and telling stories, thereby strengthening our leadership in creation and innovation, nationally and internationally.

The works produced by the NFB over the decades now constitute one of the world’s most significant audiovisual collections. Consisting of more than 13,000 titles, the collection, whose beginnings date back to the 1940s, represents a priceless heritage for all Canadians and the international community. It is an affirmation of our collective history. Conserving the collection and ensuring it remains accessible to the public and future generations are vital goals for the NFB.

The digital shift that began in 2009 enabled the NFB to establish its reputation as a leader in digital content conservation and archiving. The shift resulted in the launch of the NFB.ca online Screening Room and the creation of a collection of interactive works, as well as the development of an array of apps. The outcome garnered the attention of the technological community and has allowed the NFB to participate in major conferences in this sector. It goes without saying that our expertise has contributed to the influence of Canadian know-how in this field. 2016‒2017 will mark the last phase of our digitization and conservation plan, which will make the bulk of this audiovisual heritage available to the Canadian public. However, change continues to take place at a swift pace and, accordingly, the NFB will develop a new strategic vision for technological development that will enable it to meet the challenges posed by ever-evolving technologies and the changing needs of audiences.

In the coming years, the NFB will also seek to establish meaningful relationships and engage with Canadians while producing prestigious works that reach a wide audience. The objective is not only to reach the public, but also to spark a conversation with audiences so that they connect with our content. To that end, the NFB will enhance its digital distribution platform and continue to develop CAMPUS, its portal designed specifically for the educational community. Enhancing the educational offer, especially by developing new online courses and Virtual Classrooms, will be one of the priorities for 2016‒2017.

In order to continue to provide a relevant vision of the country’s cultural diversity to Canadians and the rest of the world, it is important to reach out to creators in Canada’s various communities to reflect a diversity of viewpoints, realities and perspectives. To achieve this, the NFB will continue to work in both official languages and maintain its engagement with francophone and anglophone minority communities by implementing its new 2016‒2018 official languages action plan. Also, as a leader in the production of works by Indigenous artists and filmmakers, the NFB intends to help promote the revival of Indigenous cultural expression and highlight the contribution of Indigenous people to Canada’s audiovisual heritage.

Since its inception, the NFB has recounted the key moments in the nation’s life. In doing so, it is a true witness to Canada’s achievements, history and values. 2016‒2017 will mark the start of festivities for the 150th anniversary of Confederation, a major celebration for Canadians. In preparation for this anniversary year, the NFB will create large-scale innovative experiences that will give citizens a unique window on their legacy and heritage.

The NFB continues to prepare for the relocation of its headquarters to the Quartier des Spectacles in downtown Montreal, scheduled for the second quarter of 2018. The move will put the NFB in the heart of the city’s cultural life, in a location conducive to interaction with the public, the industry, filmmakers and creators in other arts in Montreal, elsewhere in Canada, and around the world.

The NFB enthusiastically accepted the CRTC chairman’s invitation to co-host the Discoverability Summit, a world-class event, in May 2016. This forum on discoverability issues is a unique opportunity to reflect on the impact of digital technologies—both on the content that is produced and on how we can reach the public and establish a genuine relationship with it. It will also provide the NFB, as a public producer and distributor, with an opportunity to share its experience and expertise concerning these issues.

The NFB is proud of its achievements in recent years and continues to be focused on the future, with all the challenges to be met and opportunities to be seized. Consequently, we are already orienting our actions for the coming years. This includes stabilizing our financial situation. For more than 75 years, the NFB has ensured that the stories of people from every region of the country are told with authenticity, establishing a rich and enduring relationship with Canadians. It is through the ongoing support of the Government of Canada that this essential work can be accomplished.

Claude Joli-Coeur
Government Film Commissioner and Chairperson of the National Film Board of Canada

 

Section I: Organizational Expenditure Overview

 

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister: The Honourable Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P.

Institutional Head: Claude Joli-Coeur, Government Film Commissioner

Ministerial Portfolio: Department of Canadian Heritage

Enabling Instrument(s): National Film Act, R.S.C., c. N-8

Year of Incorporation / Commencement: 1939

Other: The NFB Board of Trustees is currently composed of eight members: the Government Film Commissioner, who acts as the Board’s chairperson, the Executive Director of Telefilm Canada and six other members appointed by the Governor in Council. With the exception of the Commissioner and Executive Director of Telefilm Canada, Board members serve three-year terms. The Board’s primary role is to define the NFB’s broad directions and approve its budgets and strategic plans.

 

Organizational Context

 

Raison d’être

The National Film Board of Canada (NFB) was created by an Act of Parliament in 1939 and is a federal agency within the Canadian Heritage portfolio. The NFB’s mandate is to produce and distribute original and innovative audiovisual works that add to our understanding of the issues facing Canadians and raise awareness of Canadian values and viewpoints across the country and around the world. Over the decades, it has become the standard for audiovisual innovation in Canada and plays an important role by highlighting the changes and key events in Canadian society.

As a producer and distributor of audiovisual works, the NFB provides a unique perspective on Canada’s cultural wealth and diversity. The NFB explores contemporary social issues through point-of-view documentaries, auteur animation and new-media content. Today, our artists and artisans continue to lead the way with advances in form and content in documentary, animation and interactive film.

 

Responsibilities

As Canada’s public producer and distributor of audiovisual works, the NFB documents the history and culture of the nation for both domestic and international audiences. Over the past 75 years, the NFB has produced more than 13,000 works and received more than 5,000 awards, inspiring and influencing generations of filmmakers in Canada and across the globe. Its audiovisual works offer special insight into the diversity and vitality of our culture and are an essential part of our national heritage.

The NFB is governed by the National Film Act and a series of other statutes, including the Financial Administration Act (which sets out the government’s financial administration structure and process), the Access to Information Act, the Privacy Act, the Official Languages Act and the Canadian Multiculturalism Act.

As a producer, the NFB carries out its responsibilities by constantly investing in new creative fields in documentary, auteur animation and interactive media. It seizes the artistic and technological opportunities that arise in the media landscape and collaborates with emerging and established filmmakers, creators and co-producers in every region of Canada, with Indigenous and culturally diverse communities as well as partners around the world. Creativity and social relevance are the core features of its productions.

 

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

1. Strategic Outcome: Canadian stories and perspectives are reflected in audiovisual media and accessible to Canadians and the world.
1.1 Program: Audiovisual Production
1.2 Program: Accessibility and Audience Engagement
1.2.1 Sub-Program: Conservation and Preservation
1.2.2 Sub-Program: Consumer Access and Engagement
1.2.3 Sub-Program: Educational and Institutional Access and Engagement
1.2.4 Sub-Program: National and International Industry Outreach
Internal Services

 

Organizational Priorities

Priority: Creative laboratory for programming

Description: Efforts made in relation to this priority will enable the NFB to develop an interdisciplinary artistic approach in order to create new art forms, increase the diversity of voices and participate in work with a national scope. With its focus on issues of social relevance, NFB storytelling brings a fresh perspective on the world and breaks new ground in content and form. Through this priority, the NFB will continue to exercise its leadership in innovation and creative excellence in both official languages.

Priority Type1 : Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
  • Implement the Strategic Plan and the programming strategy, aimed at increasing the relevance and impact of the NFB’s works.
  • Forge various types of new business partnerships that explore the potential of works from their earliest stages of development.
  • Build on short formats in the three genres in order to distribute online and expand audiences.
  • Establish documentary, interactive and animation virtual reality laboratories to assert the NFB’s position as a leader in innovation and creation.
  • Produce the Legacy 150 interactive work during the year in preparation for its launch during the festivities marking the 150th anniversary of Confederation.
April 1, 2013 March 31, 2018 1. Strategic Outcome
Program 1: Audiovisual Production

 

Priority: Creative laboratory for technology

Description: The goal is to position the NFB as a leader in the use of innovative technology for the production and distribution of content that can be easily accessed by audiences. In Canada, the NFB has been at the forefront of digital preservation and strategies to increase the accessibility of Canadian content online. The development of new technologies and creative workflows improves work processes and efficiency. Achieving the above priority will therefore further enable the NFB to share its expertise in Canada and internationally.

Priority Type: Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
  • Stand out as a leader in technological innovation by sharing the NFB’s expertise and best practices with leaders in the audiovisual technology industry.
  • Foster technological partnerships in order to continue to serve as a reference for other organizations in the digitization of audiovisual collections.
  • Undertake the last phase of the digitization and conservation plans for the active collection of NFB works.
  • Make the NFB’s active collection accessible in digital format for future generations: 90% of the active collection will have a mezzanine file and digital master by March 31, 2017.
  • Preserve and conserve the NFB’s collection on two different digital formats.
April 1, 2013 March 31, 2018 1. Strategic Outcome
Program 1: Audiovisual Production
Program 1.2: Accessibility and Audience Engagement

 

Priority: Build, reach and engage audiences

Description: The goal is to place the public at the heart of the NFB’s process of creating collective experiences and to work with audiences in an engaged and immersive creative environment. In order to expand its reach to different audience groups while being more responsive to the needs and realities of each group, the NFB must better identify and measure how these audiences are being reached.

Priority Type: Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
  • Implement a new communications and public relations strategy.
  • Increase the distribution of NFB works to the general public by enhancing the content offer of the NFB.ca Screening Room.
  • Diversify the content offer of the CAMPUS educational portal and develop new study guides and new Virtual Classrooms.
  • Increase the NFB’s presence in various communities throughout the public library network and by participating in public screenings.
  • Participate in the celebrations marking the 150th anniversary of Canadian Confederation.
  • Strengthen the NFB’s presence in the industry and Canadian society, particularly through a museum strategy that will make it possible to increase and optimize our commitments during major commemorations.
  • Highlight Inuit audiovisual heritage with the release of recent works and a new boxset.
April 1, 2013 March 31, 2018 1. Strategic Outcome
1.2: Accessibility and Audience Engagement

 

Priority: Organizational excellence (processes, collaboration and communication)

Description: The NFB is guided by the principles of good governance and accountability as it continues to earn the confidence of Canadians. This priority enables the NFB to define itself as a leading-edge creative organization that has transformed its operational model in order to optimize resources for Canadians.

In revitalizing its organizational culture, the NFB is creating an environment that favours collaboration and openness, encourages leadership, and values diversity and new operational models.

Priority Type: Ongoing

Key Supporting Initiatives
Planned Initiatives Start Date End Date Link to Department’s Program Alignment Architecture
  • Reduce the amount of filming equipment in the conservation rooms in preparation for the relocation of NFB headquarters.
  • Conduct an employee engagement survey and deploy an action plan.
  • Develop a diversity program dealing with multiculturalism, official languages and employment equity to ensure the NFB reflects Canada’s diversity.
  • Implement parts IV-V-VI and VII of the 2016‒2019 Official Languages Action Plan.
April 1, 2013 March 31, 2018 1. Strategic Outcome
1.1: Audiovisual Production
Program
1.2: Accessibility and Audience Engagement
Internal Services

 

For more information on organizational priorities, see the Minister’s mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada’s website.

 

Risk Analysis

Key Risks

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture
The impact of declining revenue on the budget
  • Continue implementing the business plan (incl. exploiting new sources of revenue, new partnerships and markets, etc.).
  • Increase the effectiveness of advertising campaigns.
Accessibility and Audience Engagement
Risk of a discrepancy between corporate capacity and workload
  • Employee engagement survey and action plan based on the survey’s results.
Accessibility and Audience Engagement
The risk of technological obsolescence—especially the NFB.ca online Screening Room
  • Increase technological monitoring.
  • 2012‒2013 to 2016‒2017 Investment Plan
  • Renewal of the Web and digital marketing platforms.
Audiovisual Production
Accessibility and Audience Engagement
Internal Service

 

Risk analysis is an activity that is integrated into the NFB’s strategic planning cycle. The NFB organizational risk profile highlights the institution’s key risks and the responses that have been put forward to manage them properly. The organizational risk profile submitted in 2013 will be updated for 2016‒2017 in order to include current risks.

The impact of declining revenue on the budget
The NFB is working to strengthen its financial capability in response to the risk of decreasing revenue. For several years, it has been managing financial challenges such as a decline in revenue. An example of the television broadcasting market’s transformation: television audiences for NFB productions increased in 2014‒2015 compared to 2013‒2014, while revenue from the same market decreased. This demonstrates that there is still a demand for NFB-produced content but, in all likelihood, the content’s sale price will continue to decline.

The entire audiovisual industry is confronted with the same problem: a greater audiovisual content offer does not necessarily translate into increased revenue, especially since the sale price of audiovisual works is decreasing. In fact, an analysis of industry trends shows that consumers are more willing to pay for content providers, than for content. Year after year, the NFB’s mitigation strategy continues to focus on actively developing new financing options.

Risk of discrepancy between corporate capacity and workload
Strong pressure on NFB resources is currently being felt as a result not only of numerous large-scale projects undertaken over the past several years and upcoming projects, but also due to downsizing in recent years. Furthermore, the risk could increase in the coming months. In order to better understand the reasons for this pressure, an engagement survey of all NFB employees will be conducted to identify excess workflows and quickly develop solutions.

The risk of technological obsolescence─especially the NFB.ca online Screening Room
The NFB is also facing challenges in regard to the Web traffic generated by the NFB.ca online Screening Room. In contrast to viewing trends on partner sites, the number of views on the online Screening Room has decreased over the past four years, leading us to conclude that the way our content is marketed in the online Screening Room needs to be examined and possibly revamped. The risk that the viewing platform created during the NFB’s digital shift in 2008‒2009 may be obsolete calls for substantive reflection on its technological infrastructure, commercial vocation and content. Therefore, the NFB will respond by revitalizing its Web and digital marketing strategy, one of the organization’s priorities for 2016‒2017.

 

Planned Expenditures

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
61,894,820 62,624,000 71,894,820 58,694,820

 

Human Resources (Full-time equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
392 392 392

 

Budgetary Planning Summary for Strategic Outcome(s) and Program(s) (dollars)
Strategic Outcome(s), Program(s) and Internal Services 2013−14
Expenditures
2014−15
Expenditures
2015-16
Forecast Spending
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
Strategic Outcome: Canadian stories and perspectives are reflected in audiovisual media and accessible to Canadians and the world.
1.1 Audiovisual Production 40,451,187 36,188,094 35,852,921 35,877,615 36,302,290 40,851,975 34,285,820
1.2 Accessibility and Audience Engagement 18,949,388 17,493,394 17,380,841 17,598,853 17,804,118 21,291,164 16,417,315
Subtotal 59,400,575 53,681,488 53,233,762 53,476,468 54,106,408 62,143,139 50,703,135
Internal Services 7,186,528 8,457,516 8,385,238 8,418,352 8,517,592 9,751,681 7,991,685
Total 66,587,103 62,139,004 61,619,000 61,894,820 62,624,000 71,894,820 58,694,820

 

The NFB expects a main estimates amount of $61.9 million for 2016-2017 to be approved by parliament. The budget was increased by $2,242,443, compared with the 2015-2016 budget. The change results from the following:

  • a $2,000,000 increase for the relocation of Montreal headquarters;
  • a $292,843 readjustment of employee benefits plan rates; and
  • a decrease related to the transfer of funding for the Canadian School of Public Service initiative ($50,400).

While pursuing the implementation of its 2013-2018 five-year strategic plan, the NFB is preparing for the relocation of its headquarters to the Quartier des Spectacles in Montreal, slated for 2018. In view of this, the NFB will receive a $2 million increase in 2016-2017 and a $12 million advance in 2017-2018. That will be followed by a drop of $1.2 million per year for 12 years starting in 2018-2019. It should be noted that these amounts have been included in programs and internal services in the table on the previous page.

Moreover, planned expenditures for 2016-2017 are higher than the main estimates due to the anticipated carry-over from the previous year, the planned parliamentary appropriations for maternity and parental leave and severance pay, as well as estimated salary reviews. The table below shows the variations in relation to the 2015-2016 main estimates:

(in dollars) Forecast Spending
2015-16
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
Main estimates 2015-16 59,652,377 59,652,377 59,652,377 59,652,377 59,652,377
Adjustments:          
Employee benefits adjustment (from 25.5% to 26.5%) 0 292,843 292,843 292,843 292,843
Government initiatives 0 - 50,400 - 50,400 - 50,400 - 50,400
MTL’s Headquarters Relocation 0 2,000,000 2,000,000 12,000,000 -1,200,000
Severance pay and maternity leave 734,623 0 363,180 0 0
Salary revisions 0 0 139,000 0 0
Net carry forward 1,232,000 0 227,000 0 0
 
Total adjustments 1,966,623 2,242,443 2,971,623 12,242,443 - 957,557
TOTAL – Planned Spending 61,619,000 61,894,820 62,624,000 71,894,820 58,694,820

 

Alignment of Spending With the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016-17 Planned Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)
Strategic Outcome Program Spending Area Government of Canada Outcome 2016-17
Planned Spending
1 Canadian stories and perspectives are reflected in audiovisual media and accessible to Canadians and the world. 1.1 Audiovisual Production Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 36,302,290
1.2 Accessibility and Audience Engagement Social Affairs A vibrant Canadian culture and heritage 17,804,118

 

Total Planned Spending by Spending Area (dollars)
Spending Area Total Planned Spending
Economic Affairs -
Social Affairs 54,106,408
International Affairs -
Government Affairs -

 

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

[D]

The voted appropriation includes advances from the Treasury Board totalling $14.4 million for the relocation of Montreal headquarters scheduled for 2018. They are distributed as follows: $400,000 in 2014-2015, $2 million in 2016-2017 and $12 million in 2017-2018. These interest-free advances are repayable over a 12-year period at a rate of $1.2 million per year starting in 2018-2019.

 

Estimates by Vote

For information on National Film Board’s organizational appropriations, consult the 2016–17 Main Estimates.

 

Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

 

Strategic Outcome: Canadian stories and perspectives are reflected in audiovisual media and accessible to Canadians and the world.

Performance Measurement
Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Percentage of Canadian population who indicate that NFB productions reflect Canadian stories or perspectives 80% March 31, 2018
Canadian stories and perspectives: percentage of completed productions exploring Canadian diversity 70% March 31, 2018
Canadian stories and perspectives: percentage of completed productions exploring socially relevant issues 80% March 31, 2018
Number of titles available on NFB.ca/ONF.ca 3,500 March 31, 2018

 

Breakdown by Sub-program

Breakdown by Sub-program

[D]

 

Program 1.1: Audiovisual Production

Description
This program activity contributes to Canadians’ understanding of the issues facing our country and raises awareness of Canadian viewpoints around the world.

As a public sector producer, the NFB produces original audiovisual works that reflect diverse Canadian perspectives, including cultural, regional and Indigenous, and emanate from the diverse creators and communities that make up the country. This program activity operates where the private sector doesn’t, allowing creators to explore artistic and technological advances in form and content. It also ensures the identification, development and nurturing of talent and creative skills within filmmaking and other creative communities.

NFB programming is necessary to ensure that Canadians have access to diverse voices and content in both official languages. It promotes Canadian culture and values in events of national historic and cultural significance. As Canadians’ media consumption migrates online, the NFB provides leadership in the creation of innovative digital content in both official languages. Production activities include the conceptualization, research, development and production of documentaries, animation, new media content and other emerging forms.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
35,877,615 36,302,290 40,851,975 34,285,820

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
191 191 191

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
The NFB’s audiovisual works are innovative Percentage of Canadian public that perceives the NFB as an innovative, creative institution 70% innovative
80% creative
March 31, 2018
Percentage of prestige awards and tributes among total number of awards earned at Canadian and international festivals (i.e., innovation-related awards, creative excellence awards, tributes, Canada Award for Diversity) 25% March 31, 2018
Emerging and established Canadian creators at the NFB reflect Canada’s diversity Percentage of completed audiovisual works by emerging filmmakers2 30% March 31, 2018
Numbers of emerging filmmakers working on a film at the NFB or participating in NFB-organized talent-nurturing initiatives, including competitions 120 March 31, 2018
Percentage of completed audio-visual works by culturally, regionally and linguistically diverse filmmakers, Indigenous filmmakers and people with disabilities 55% March 31, 2018
Events of historic and cultural significance promoting Canadian culture and values include NFB participation Number of productions for major national and international projects 13 March 31, 2018

 

Planning Highlights

As a leader in the creation of innovative Canadian cultural content, the NFB produces social-issue documentaries and groundbreaking interactive works, as well as auteur animated films and immersive experiences. In 2016‒2017, the Creation and Innovation division will implement its strategic plan and programming strategy aimed at increasing the relevance and impact of its works. The NFB intends to develop and strengthen the level of interaction and lasting engagement with its audiences in Canada and around the world. It also intends to position itself as a leader in innovation and creation and to create new business partnerships to harness the full potential of works from their earliest stages of development.

Programming
Together with talented and renowned creators and artists, the NFB will produce several major documentaries intended for the big screen, such as Le paradoxe de la faim by Mathieu Roy, which considers the global food crisis from the perspective of farmers; and What Is Democracy? by Astra Taylor, a quest to better understand the paradoxes and joys of democracy and the challenges of growing inequality.

The NFB creates works that are the expression of unique regional voices and collaborates with filmmakers from different communities to tell their stories. One of these productions, the documentary Children’s Court Case by renowned filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin, gives us rare access to Superior Court in Ottawa, in a landmark case against the Canadian Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development involving the systematic underfunding of education on Indian reserves. Also of note is Le dernier placard by Paul-Émile d’Entremont, from the Canadian Francophonie Studio – Acadie, which deals with homophobia experienced by adolescents and young adults in sports.

In 2016‒2017, the NFB will concentrate on short formats in its three core genres (documentary, interactive, and animation) in an effort to reach broader audiences online. Examples include The 5 Shorts project, in collaboration with Bande Sonimage at the documentary studio; an international co-production with Sacrebleu (France) entitled Les Bédéistes s’animent, comprising four animated shorts by renowned cartoonists; and Scott Parker’s Grasslands, a series of short films on the history of communities in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan and the issues that are important to them. Finally, a collaboration with the online editions of the New York Times Op-Docs and The Guardian will provide opportunities to better position the NFB’s feature-length documentaries so as to reach a broad Canadian and international audience.

The first animated feature film co-produced by the NFB, Window Horses, directed by Ann Marie Fleming and featuring the voice of Sandra Oh, and the animated short Animal Behaviour by the Oscar-winning duo Alison Snowden and David Fine, will be launched in 2016‒2017. The medium-length film Physique de la tristesse by acclaimed filmmaker Theodore Ushev will be in production.

Additionally, the English and French Programs will focus their efforts on immersive and virtual reality creative labs in the three genres, seeking to create new experiences, enhance projects and serve as an incubator for the finest talent. Major VR projects will be launched during the year, such as Ennemi by Karim Ben Khelifa and Taro’s World by Paisley Smith. Ocean School, an ambitious educational project for CAMPUS by the English and French Programs, in partnership with Dalhousie University in Halifax, will be in production during the year. This interactive project uses virtual reality to teach students about our oceans.

Several productions will be added to the outstanding collection of auteur documentary, animated and photographic works still in distribution, including the fourth ARTE/NFB co-production, Guy Maddin’s Seances, which reinvents the scripts of 30 lost films of the silent era. Pirate ta boutique is a participatory work by Joël Ronez on the new digital sharing economies.

Talent training and professional development
The NFB will continue to prioritize training emerging talent in the documentary and animation fields, in particular through two projects that will be produced during summer 2016 as part of the Tremplin competition, which targets emerging creators in Canadian francophone communities. Hothouse, an English Program Animation Studio initiative, is geared to new creators from across Canada. Now in its 11th edition, Hothouse will introduce a new structure that allows other Program studios across the country to participate in order to ensure better national representation.

High-profile projects
Mention should also be made of the NFB’s new partnership with Space for Life. Under this partnership agreement, the NFB will create a highly innovative project: a 23-minute immersive work to be launched in spring 2017 in the Chaos Theatre dome at Montreal’s Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium.

The NFB will produce major national projects over the course of the year for the festivities surrounding the 150th anniversary of Confederation. These include Legacy 150, a series of 12 interactive photo essays addressing the theme of our collective heritage. The essays will provide original and unexpected perspectives on who we are and where we’re going; on what we have inherited from the past and what we will leave to future generations.

 

Program 1.2: Accessibility and Audience Engagement Program

Description
This program ensures that Canadians and world audiences are able to access, view, discuss and engage with innovative Canadian content that reflects Canadian stories and perspectives. As media consumption migrates online, Canadian content must be made available in all digital and mobile forms.

Delivery mechanisms include the distribution, marketing and commercialization of audiovisual works via a diverse catalogue, a well-established stock footage library, the development of diversified markets (i.e., theatrical, television, consumer and institutional) via online and traditional channels in Canada and abroad. These activities make works widely accessible across Canada, notably to underserved and remote communities and Indigenous and official-language minority communities. The NFB’s accessibility and audience engagement activities contribute to a dynamic Canadian culture and heritage.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
17,598,853 17,804,118 21,291,164 16,417,315

 

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents [FTEs])
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
150 150 150

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Canadian and international audiences view and engage with NFB works Percentage of Canadian population who say they viewed an NFB production in the last year 40% March 31, 2018
Total number of views of NFB works 45 million March 31, 2018
Total number of users by level of engagement (registered or customer)3 500,000 registered and 22,500 customers March 31, 2018
Total revenues generated $2.9 million March 31, 2018

 

Planning Highlights

In order to make its works accessible and interact with audiences in 2016-2017, the NFB’s strategy will be based primarily on increasing the visibility of the NFB and its works, promoting and renewing its digital offer, and interacting with the public.

Visibility of the NFB and its works
A new public relations and positioning strategy will be implemented to ensure that the NFB and its works are more visible to the general public. This strategy will also focus on partnerships to reach broader audiences across the country and on a variety of distribution platforms. Additionally, the celebrations marking the 150th anniversary of Confederation will be an opportunity to showcase the NFB and Canada’s audiovisual heritage.

Promoting and renewing the content offer
The NFB.ca | ONF.ca online Screening Room will continue to be the main showcase for reaching and interacting with the general public and the educational and institutional sectors. However, since competition among online distribution platforms is fiercer than ever, the NFB will review its digital accessibility strategy and the NFB.ca | ONF.ca global ecosystem.

In addition, a new selection of works will enhance the collection of thousands of NFB films offered online, mostly for free streaming. Enriching the educational offer, particularly through the development of new online courses and Virtual Classrooms, will also be a priority for 2016‒2017.

Interacting with the public
The NFB also wants to ensure audiences engage with the audiovisual works it produces, via festivals, public screenings and social media. The objective is not only to reach the members of the public but also to spark conversations so that they can connect with our content.

 

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Conservation and Preservation

Description
NFB productions, regardless of the work’s original source, are preserved and digitized in order to ensure their permanence and their accessibility to Canadians and the world, now and in future generations. This sub-program reduces the risks of technological obsolescence, minimizes the effects of time on the media on which works are recorded, and guarantees the physical security of works. Preservation and conservation require suitable tools and systems for identification, management, archiving and restoration. As Canadians’ media consumption migrates online, it is imperative that high-quality innovative Canadian content is available to them. Without a concerted conservation and preservation activity, this cultural heritage is at risk of loss.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
2,243,319 2,682,687 2,068,582

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
15 15 15

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
The NFB collection is safeguarded and protected Number of works in the collection available on two different physical media and situated at two separate geographical locations 1,000 titles per year March 31, 2017
The NFB collection is made accessible digitally to future generations Percentage of works in the collection that have a mezzanine file 90% March 31, 2017

 

Planning Highlights

The last phase of the plans for digitizing and conserving the NFB’s active collection of audiovisual works will continue in 2016‒2017 and will be completed before the relocation of headquarters the following year. The collection is also expanded each year with the addition of new NFB productions, earlier works and stock footage. As a result, the bulk of this valuable audiovisual heritage will be preserved and accessible to future generations.

Over the past few years, most of the works in the NFB’s active collection have been processed for conservation purposes as per the conservation plan’s objective. However, processing works in 2016‒2017 will involve greater technical complexity4 than in the past. Therefore the conservation and preservation target has been revised.

In addition to the 1,000 works slated to be processed in 2016‒2017, approximately 300 recent works produced in digital format will be conserved on two different physical media in 2016‒2017. Regarding the relocation of these works, they will be secured in two separate locations the following year in order to lower the costs associated with this operation.

It is anticipated that 8,000 titles in the NFB’s active collection will be made available on an image and sound digital-source master and in a mezzanine file so that content can be offered in both official languages, in the desired format, and “just-in-time” delivery can be provided to the public. About 90% of this objective will be met in 2016‒2017.

Therefore, the digitization and conservation plan’s objectives will be met in 2017‒ 2018 to give the institution greater flexibility in the management, conservation and accessibility of its audiovisual collection. The NFB plans to consolidate the management of these digital assets in the coming years and extend its digitization and conservation operations to works and archival footage in its inactive collection.

 

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Consumer Access and Engagement

Description
This sub-program delivers Canadian audiovisual works to Canadian and international consumers. It exists to allow individual consumers to access and engage with Canadian cultural products that reflect our history and values and that interpret Canada to Canadians and to other nations. In so doing, national and international consumers share in a dynamic Canadian culture and heritage.

Delivery mechanisms include the distribution, marketing and commercialization of audiovisual works via a diverse catalogue, the development of diversified markets and channels, i.e.: theatrical, television and Internet/mobile and hard goods in Canada and abroad.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
10,041,523 12,008,216 9,259,365

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
71 71 71

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Consumers view NFB audiovisual works on multiple access channels Number of views through consumer access channels (i.e., TV, theatrical, home video, DVD, streaming, etc.) 35 million March 31, 2018
Consumers engage with the NFB Number of consumers by level of engagement (registered or customers) 475,000 registered;
15,000 customers
March 31, 2018
Revenues generated through consumer access channels $1.6 million March 31, 2018

 

Planning Highlights

One of the priorities in 2016‒2017 will be to further capitalize on the NFB brand by strengthening its positioning and the values it projects in Canadian society. This will be accomplished in particular through the organization’s new brand identity and by implementing a public relations and positioning strategy intended to result in improved NFB visibility with respect to the general public. The strategy will aim to better showcase our works in production and maximize the scope of film marketing activities.

Distribution of NFB works
The total number of views by the general public via all the available platforms and access channels is expected to reach approximately 35 million in 2016‒2017. The NFB.ca | ONF.ca online Screening Room will continue to be the main showcase for promoting and distributing thousands of NFB works, most of which are offered to the public free of charge. Also, the fee-based offer of NFB works and productions by our partners will become more diversified with the addition of new films on this platform.

Improving the performance of the NFB.ca | ONF.ca platform and its features remains a priority for the NFB. In light of constantly changing technology and increasing competition in this sector, the NFB will rethink its business model for the digital distribution of its works and revise the NFB.ca | ONF.ca online Screening Room technological architecture. The objective of this endeavour is to develop a new digital strategy for this platform.

Partnerships
Partnerships also remain crucial to the NFB in terms of reaching the country’s audiences on a variety of distribution platforms. Several partnerships will continue, including those with Air Canada and Via Rail, which offer travellers a broad range of NFB works, as well as with content platforms such as Netflix Canada, iTunes, YouTube, Vimeo, etc.

Social media
Social media will also have an important place in the NFB Accessibility Strategy, particularly through the development of content and an exclusive offer for online communities. Our business processes will also be optimized to meet the needs of various communities. The NFB hopes that nearly half a million people will interact with the NFB in 2016‒2017 through social media and various interactive NFB platforms.

NFB Images
In light of the success of NFB Images in Quebec, efforts will be made to promote the richness of the NFB’s audiovisual stock-footage collection to the English-speaking Canadian market in order to increase revenue in this sector.

 

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Educational and Institutional Access and Engagement

Description
This sub-program enables Canadian and international educational and institutional groups to provide Canadian cultural products and their inherent values to their members and students. It supports the distribution and the use of Canadian audiovisual works and content, which include educational workshops and pedagogical activities to Canadian and international educational and institutional audiences. NFB productions and content must be widely accessible, promoted and distributed to Canadian and international Educational markets (teachers, schools, school boards, colleges, universities and ministries of education), as well as Institutional markets (public libraries, social and health services, community and cultural associations and businesses) to engage Canadian youth and to support their educational activities. Delivery mechanisms include the distribution, marketing and commercialization of audiovisual works via a diverse catalogue, the development of diversified channels, i.e.: Internet, mobile and hard goods in Canada and abroad.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
4,237,380 5,067,297 3,907,321

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
43 43 43

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
Educational and institutional audiences view NFB audiovisual works on multiple access channels Number of views through educational access channels (DVD sales to schools, teacher workshops, education online subscriptions, etc.) 10 million March 31, 2018
Educational and institutional audiences engage with the NFB Number of Educational Users by level of engagement (registered or customer) 25,000 registered;
7,500 customers
March 31, 2018
Number of pedagogical materials downloaded 30,000 March 31, 2018
Revenues generated through educational access channels $1.3 million March 31, 2018

 

Planning Highlights

2016‒2017 will be a year of transition for the Education department: from now on, the NFB’s educational activities will be concentrated online. In making this shift, the Education department wants to better focus its efforts to expand its audience and assert its expertise across the country and around the world. The NFB will also continue to reach Canadian communities everywhere through screenings and a variety of events geared to the general public.

The CAMPUS platform for the educational community
The content offer of the CAMPUS portal, which is the NFB’s main showcase for the education community, will be enriched by the addition of Canadian documentaries and study guides created to assist educators. Developing the American market also remains an Education department priority through the deployment of CAMPUS USA and BIBLIOLABS.

Online workshops
New online courses will also be developed as part of a five-year partnership with the Marguerite-Bourgeoys School Board (Montreal). Five courses in media production will be devised for high school students, each spread out over one school year. This pilot project will enable us to create a solid content base for expanding our future online offer.

Virtual Classrooms
Four new Virtual Classrooms will also be offered throughout the country, in French and English, the most notable of which is related to the film A Dark Room, which explores the issue of concussions and safety in sports.

Public screenings
The NFB will also continue to have a presence across Canada, at public screenings, in theatres, museums, and libraries, and in conjunction with public events. The NFB’s participation in such events as The Shortest Day and L’ONF à la maison will continue, as will our partnerships with hundreds of public libraries throughout the country.

 

Sub-Program 1.2.4: National and International Industry Outreach

Description
Through this sub-program, the NFB enables the Canadian and international audiovisual industry to participate in the promotion of Canadian culture and heritage via private and public sector partnerships. These partnerships facilitate the exchange of knowledge and creativity; foster close collaboration with industry in major festivals and markets (i.e., MIP, BANFF, Hot Docs, Sunny Side of the doc) through panel discussions, Q&As, competitions, awards, etc. Activities also include the marketing and promotion of NFB audiovisual works and thematic compilations in major national and international festivals/markets as well as events of significance (such as Oscar nominations, World Expositions, Québec City’s 400th anniversary), and the marketing and promotion of retrospectives on the NFB and its acclaimed filmmakers (Norman McLaren, Pierre Perrault, Alanis Obomsawin).

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
1,281,896 1,532,964 1,182,047

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
21 21 21

 

Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to Be Achieved
The NFB’s expertise is recognized at a broad range of major festivals and industry events in Canada and abroad Number of events (such as panels, presentations, roundtables) with NFB experts participating 60 March 31, 2018
Participants present Number of participants at these events 35,000 March 31, 2018
NFB films selected in festivals Number of NFB films selected in Canadian and international festivals 400 March 31, 2018

 

Planning Highlights

As is the case every year, NFB creators and artisans will be making the rounds on the national and international festival scene, sharing their knowledge and experience with audiences and ensuring they experience their works to the fullest. The NFB wants to strengthen its presence in the industry and Canadian society and emphasize the importance of providing innovative content to Canadians.

The 150th-anniversary celebrations of Canadian Confederation will also be central to NFB initiatives to showcase its work, which will include the presentation of the Legacy 150 project. Other projects, currently in development, will round out its contribution, and the NFB will feature special programming on its digital platforms that will highlight Canada’s audiovisual heritage.

Museums and exhibition centres
The NFB will develop a museum strategy that allows the institution to enhance and optimize its involvement in major commemorations, and to be a leading content partner by sharing Canada’s audiovisual heritage and developing new programming and educational activities.

Indigenous communities
The NFB intends to help promote a renewal of Indigenous cultural expression by featuring recent works by Indigenous filmmakers, such as The Road Forward by Marie Clements. The new six-film box set Unikkausivut – Nunatsiavut, the latest component of an NFB initiative to highlight Inuit audiovisual heritage, will also be an opportunity to promote Inuit contribution to the country’s audiovisual heritage.

The Discoverability Summit
The NFB will be a partner of The Discoverability Summit organized by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), to be held in Toronto in May 2016. The summit’s objectives are to explore new avenues for reaching the target public and to consider unprecedented approaches to presenting content to these audiences and creating links that point them in the direction of the content they want to see. Discoverability is an issue that is directly related to our mandate as a public producer and distributor.

 

Internal Services

Description
Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. Internal services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization, and not those provided to a specific program. The groups of activities are Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2017-18
Planned Spending
2018-19
Planned Spending
8,418,352 8,517,592 9,751,681 7,991,685

 

Human Resources (FTEs)
2016-17 2017-18 2018-19
51 51 51

 

Planning Highlights

Forging technology partnerships
The NFB wishes to continue to serve as a reference for the digitization of audiovisual collections at the federal, provincial and municipal levels, in Canada and internationally. It will continue to forge partnerships this year with traditional and non-traditional stakeholders in the audiovisual sector. Our objectives: share expertise and services, and diversify sources of revenue.

Standing out as a leader in technological innovation
The NFB’s Research and Development and Information Technology teams will continue to monitor new technologies and share expertise and best practices with leaders of the audiovisual technology industry.

The NFB thus contributes to highlighting the excellence of Canadian expertise in this field. In 2016‒2017, our engineers and technicians will again participate in major events such as conferences organized by the Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers (SMPTE), National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), etc.

Downsizing equipment in the conservation rooms
One of the projects that will be carried out in preparation for the relocation of NFB headquarters is a reduction in the amount of film equipment stored in the conservation rooms. Our conservation experts will work closely with those in charge of programming during the process, which involves assessing the film equipment’s heritage and commercial value. Equipment that does not meet retention criteria will be destroyed in accordance with current NFB procedures.

Conducting an employee engagement survey
As a distinct employer of the federal public service, the NFB does not participate in the Public Service Employee Survey (PSES) conducted every three years by the Treasury Board Secretariat. In anticipation of the relocation of its head office, the NFB plans to conduct its own survey in 2016‒2017. As is the case with the PSES, the purpose of the survey will be to measure employees’ opinions concerning engagement, leadership, and the workplace.

Official languages
In 2016‒2017, the NFB will implement its new 2016‒2018 Action Plan for parts IV-V-VI and VII of the Official Languages Act.

Developing a diversity program
One of the NFB’s objectives has always been to work with creators from different Canadian communities, to ensure that its works explore a variety of narrative modes and reflect diverse perspectives and realities. Following the NFB’s 2013‒2018 Strategic Plan and an audit by the Canadian Human Rights Commission on employment equity, creating a diversity management program has become a priority for 2016‒2017. The audit made it possible to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement: the NFB intends to follow up on the Commission’s findings and implement its new action plan on employment equity so that its workforce is more representative of Canada’s demographic and cultural diversity.

 

Section III: Supplementary Information

 

Future-Oriented Statement of Operations

The Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations provides a general overview of the National Film Board’s operations. The forecast of financial information on expenses and revenues is prepared on an accrual accounting basis to strengthen accountability and to improve transparency and financial management.

Because the Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations is prepared on an accrual accounting basis, and the forecast and planned spending amounts presented in other sections of the Report on Plans and Priorities are prepared on an expenditure basis, amounts may differ.

A more detailed Future-Oriented Statement of Operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on the National Film Board’s website.

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year Ended March 31
(dollars)

Financial information 2015-16
Forecast Results
2016-17
Planned Results
Difference (2016–17 Planned Results minus 2015–16 Forecast Results)
Total expenses 64,792,000 64,744,000 (48,000)
Total revenues 3,740,000 5,583,000 1,843,000
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 61,052,000 59,161,000 (1,891,000)

 

Expenditures

The planned operating expenses of $64,744,000 for 2016-2017 are similar to those of 2015-2016, estimated at $64,792,000.

Revenue

The NFB expects to increase its revenue by $1,843,000. The increase stems from a major partnership under discussion in the educational market. Moreover, the audiovisual markets are continuing their transition to digital format and the reduction in DVD products is only partially offset by digital format sales.

 

Supplementary Information Tables

The supplementary information tables listed in the 2016–17 Report on Plans and Priorities are available on the National Film Board’s website

 

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in that publication are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

 

Section IV: Organizational Contact Information

National Film Board of Canada
3155 Côte de Liesse Road
Montréal, Quebec H4N 2N4
Canada

Strategic Planning and Government relations
reports@onf-nfb.gc.ca
514-261-5849

 

Appendix: Definitions

Appropriation: Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures: Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Departmental Performance Report: Reports on an appropriated organization’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Reports on Plans and Priorities. These reports are tabled in Parliament in the fall.

full time equivalent: A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

Government of Canada outcomes: A set of 16 high level objectives defined for the government as a whole, grouped in four spending areas: economic affairs, social affairs, international affairs and government affairs.

Management, Resources and Results Structure: A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.

non-budgetary expenditures: Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance: What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator: A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting: The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

planned spending: For Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPPs) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPRs), planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their RPPs and DPRs.

plans: The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

priorities: Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).

program: A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.

Program Alignment Architecture: A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.

Report on Plans and Priorities: Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated organizations over a three year period. These reports are tabled in Parliament each spring.

results: An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures: Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome: A long term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

sunset program: A time limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.

target: A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures: Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

whole of government framework: Maps the financial contributions of federal organizations receiving appropriations by aligning their Programs to a set of 16 government wide, high level outcome areas, grouped under four spending areas.

 


1- Type is defined as follows: previously committed to ‒ committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing ‒ committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new ‒ newly committed to in the reporting year of the Report on Plans and Priorities or the Departmental Performance Report.

2- To be considered “emerging,” it must be the filmmaker’s first, second or third film.

3- “Registered users” are those who have opted into a non-transactional relationship with the NFB by providing contact information, registering as fans (i.e., Facebook), subscribing to NFB newsletters or channels, creating an online NFB profile, etc.; “Customers” are individuals or organizations who have paid transactions with the NFB.

4- Works in the active collection that were simpler and easier to process were given priority over the past few years in order to make a larger number of works available in digital format. Therefore, the works that will be processed in 2016-2017 require more laborious conservation and preservation work due the level of quality of the original recordings.