Departmental Results Report for 2018-2019

National Film Board of Canada

2018-19
Departmental Performance Report

The Honourable Steven Guilbeault, P.C., M.P.

Minister of Canadian Heritage

© National Film Board of Canada, 2019

Cat. No. NF1-5E-PDF

ISSN 2560-9238

Download PDF version

Minister’s message

Commissioner’s Message

Results at a glance

Results: what we achieved

Audiovisual Programming and Production

Content Accessibility and Audience Engagement

Internal Services

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Actual human resources

Expenditures by vote

Government of Canada spending and activities

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

Financial statements highlights

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Reporting Framework

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Supplementary information tables

Federal tax expenditures

Organizational contact information

Appendix: definitions

Endnotes

 

Minister’s message

Steven GuilbeaultThe organizations in the Canadian Heritage Portfolio, including the National Film Board of Canada (NFB), play an important role in our society. They contribute to the vitality of the arts, culture, heritage and audiovisual sectors, while also highlighting our diversity in a spirit of inclusion and respect. This year, as we mark the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act, we have a wonderful opportunity to highlight how proud these organizations make us of everything that allows our country to stand out—including our linguistic duality, Indigenous languages and cultures, and the amazing talent and creativity of Canadians.

In 2018–19, the NFB showcased this talent and creativity by collaborating with Canadian storytellers to achieve the highest level of productions, reflecting Canada’s richness and diversity, for both Canadian and international audiences. The NFB produced award-winning audiovisual works that reflect original perspectives on Canadian realities and made these works more widely accessible, achieved its gender-parity targets, and provided more support to Indigenous creators by increasing spending on Indigenous-led projects.

As Minister of Canadian Heritage, I invite you to have a look at the 2018–2019 Departmental Results Report for the National Film Board of Canada. In it, you will see evidence of the prominence and success that have made the National Film Board the envy of creators everywhere.

The Honourable Steven Guilbeault*

*Appointed on November 20, 2019.

 

Commissioner’s Message

Claude JolicoeurOn May 2, 2019, the NFB turned 80 years old. The occasion presented an opportunity to recall the role and relevance of a celebrated institution which, for eight decades now, has been the embodiment of Canadian storytelling and stories. Our stories. These experiences and perspectives continue to be showcased thanks to the talent of hundreds of artists and artisans from coast to coast to coast, who harness their innovation and creativity with the help of our expert, dedicated production teams.

In 2018–2019, the NFB produced or co-produced 88 works—an increase of 22% over the previous year. That output was matched by record numbers of views, both nationally and internationally: overall, the NFB recorded an increase of nearly 10% in views of its works, on all platforms combined, thanks to targeted, effective marketing and distribution strategies.

The NFB has always worked tirelessly to carry out its mandate as a public producer and distributor, and we intend to continue to do so by drawing on creative resources from across the country, including a bold and confident generation of emerging creators. In this spirit, our mentoring and apprenticeship programs remain active, having amply demonstrated that they serve as talent incubators for a generation that’s keen to perpetuate tradition, in their own way. The NFB also continues to be the custodian of Canada’s audiovisual heritage, preserving and digitizing it and making it available to all Canadians, as well as the entire world. In 2018–2019, the NFB conservation room teams were busy planning the relocation of this treasure trove of works to new, state-of-the-art facilities.

We also ramped up our preparations for the move of our headquarters to a new building in the heart of Montreal’s Quartier des Spectacles district, well aware that we’re writing a new chapter in the NFB’s (his)story, one that follows the many years we spent on Côte-de-Liesse Road. Our goal is to be a landmark of the Canadian audiovisual industry. In addition to providing a space for creators and supporting them as they bring their works to life, the new NFB headquarters will be hosting a public space that’s destined to become a meeting place for these artists and artisans, our experts, and members of the public.

We’re looking forward to seeing you there.

Claude Joli-Coeur

Government Film Commissioner and Chairperson of the National Film Board of Canada

 

Results at a glance

 

For more information on the National Film Board’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

1. A new vision for creation: In 2018–2019, the NFB produced a total of 88 original productions, including 61 documentaries, 7 animated films and 20 interactive works. NFB works won 124 awards (59 in Canada and 65 abroad). The NFB also launched a programming vision designed to foster better understanding among the public of the many perspectives that shape the country’s reality—a vision that will help steer the development of the NFB’s projects in the future.

2. Reaching larger audiences: 2018–2019 was a remarkable year with respect to making NFB works more widely accessible. NFB productions garnered close to 74 million views in Canada and internationally, surpassing the 68 million views received in 2017–2018 (see page 13 for the definition of “views”). Overall online views totalled 48.1 million, a 5% increase over 2017–2018.

3. Supporting diversity and inclusion: The NFB’s key results include achieving its gender-parity commitments and coming close to achieving production targets set out in its 2017–2020 Indigenous Action Plan.

  • 34% of NFB works produced in 2018–2019 were directed by women, and 44% of the NFB’s production spending was allocated to works directed by women.
  • The number of Indigenous-directed NFB projects in development or production increased from 30 in 2017–2018 to 40 in 2018–2019. These projects represented 15% of overall NFB production spending.

4. A major financial-management transformation: In 2018–2019, the migration of the NFB’s financial and physical resource-management systems to the SAP platform was the most significant achievement in terms of the modernization of the NFB’s management tools and technological infrastructure.

5. An organization with an eye to the future: 2018–2019 saw a good deal of planning for the move of the head office to Îlot Balmoral; construction of the building continued and the staff move was postponed to fall 2019. The NFB continued to implement major organizational-development projects that have been in progress for the past few years, such as its multi-year workplace-transformation initiative, In It Together.

 

Results: what we achieved
Core Responsibilities

 

Audiovisual Programming and Production

Description

The National Film Board’s mandate is to create relevant and innovative audiovisual content that interprets Canada and its diversity to Canadians and people around the world. The National Film Board works with filmmakers and artists from every region of Canada to produce exceptional documentaries, animated films, and interactive/immersive works rooted in Canadian experiences and realities. The National Film Board has long been a champion of technological and film innovation, both nationally and internationally. The National Film Board seeks to reflect the perspectives and experiences of communities that are systematically under-represented in the media and to develop innovative new storytelling forms and approaches.

Results

In 2018–2019, the NFB produced a total of 88 original productions, including 61 documentaries, 7 animated films and 20 interactive works (including 5 installations, 2 virtual reality works, 11 mobile apps and 2 websites). NFB works won 124 awards (59 in Canada and 65 abroad). Below is a summary of the NFB’s main achievements in audiovisual programming and production in 2018–2019, with a focus on the organizational priority of reaching wider audiences.

A new vision for creation, with programming that’s even more daring and innovative

In 2018–2019, the NFB launched a programming vision designed to foster better understanding among the public of the many perspectives that shape the country’s reality and our collective imagination. Anchored in four pillars—a powerful bond with the Canadian public, a focus on innovation, better representation of the diversity of voices, and close collaboration between the organization’s departments and studios—this vision will help steer the development of the NFB’s projects in the future. Production highlights that contributed to departmental results in the fields of documentary, auteur animation, and immersive experiences are outlined below.

Documentary

Creative feature documentaries continue to be a core strategic area of focus for the NFB, and the 2018–2019 year was particularly exceptional in terms of the number of feature-length documentaries produced by the NFB (a total of 61 documentaries). Five of these films were selected to screen in competition at the 2018 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Film Festival in Toronto, the largest documentary festival in North America and the second largest in the world: Julien Fréchette’s Ma guerre (My War), Jean-François Caissy’s Premières armes (First Stripes), Laura Marie Wayne’s Love, Scott, Christy Garland’s What Walaa Wants, and Samara Grace Chadwick’s 1999.

Other notable productions completed in 2018–2019 include Sans maman (Unmothered), by Marie-France Guerrette, as well as two important works about passionate and iconic Quebec artists: Michel La Veaux’s feature documentary Labrecque, une caméra pour la mémoire (Labrecque, from Film to Memory) and Pauline Julien, intime et politique (Pauline Julien, Intimate and Political), directed by Pascale Ferland and produced in collaboration with Radio-Canada, which follows the legendary Quebec singer on a journey through key moments in the province’s history, viewed from a feminist perspective.

The NFB also produced its first online documentary series, True North, a nine-part look at the rise of the Toronto youth basketball scene made in collaboration with Red Bull Media House. Directed by Vancouver’s Ryan Sidhoo, True North was released simultaneously on NFB.ca, YouTube and Red Bull’s platform, as 400 members of Toronto’s basketball community gathered at Daniels Spectrum in the city’s Regent Park neighbourhood to celebrate the launch. The series format and the coordinated online distribution with Red Bull Media House was new ground for the NFB and proved to be highly successful, resulting in more than 140,000 views in Canada.

Animation

The NFB’s animation studios produced or co-produced 7 short films last year. Once again, many of our animators—a group comprising a broad spectrum of both emerging and veteran talent—have seen their works celebrated by festival juries and audiences around the world, including a Best Animated Short Oscar nomination for the film Animal Behaviour.

Other notable titles include Bone Mother, by Dale Hayward and Sylvie Trouvé, a visually captivating blend of modern 3D-printing technology and thousands of painstakingly hand-painted models; The Zoo, by acclaimed filmmaker Julia Kwan (Fire Horse Productions/NFB), which makes a poignant statement about gentrification and abandonment of the elderly through its tale of a captive polar bear; and I’m OK, by global animation sensation Elizabeth Hobbs (Animate Projects/NFB), a short film that explores expressionist artist Oskar Kokoschka’s traumatic life experiences by reflecting on his prints and paintings.

Interactive and immersive works, and virtual reality

2018–2019 saw the release of some of the NFB’s most innovative virtual reality (VR) and immersive works to date. Demonstrating the NFB’s emphasis on originality and inventive use of technology, these works resonated with Canadian and international audiences, and enabled the NFB to connect more directly with members of the public everywhere. Proof of this were the 13,000 visits in Canada and abroad for Biidaaban: First Light, an interactive, room-scale VR installation by award-winning Anishinaabe artist Lisa Jackson, 3D artist Mathew Borrett, digital design and experience agency Jam3, and the NFB.

Other groundbreaking NFB virtual reality experiences from 2018–2019 include Museum of Symmetry, created by Ottawa-native cartoonist and animator Paloma Dawkins and developed by Casa Rara Studio; and the VR project Rêve (Dream), by musician Philippe Lambert. This immersive experience was inspired by the mechanism of dreaming, conjuring animated dreamscapes that are transformed by an audiovisual synthesizer.

In the interactive narrative format, the NFB developed several successful apps in 2018–2019. Based on real events, East of the Rockies (Jam3/NFB), an augmented reality (AR) app with immersive visuals, explored life in one of Canada’s Japanese internment camps during the Second World War. Written by acclaimed Canadian author Joy Kogawa, the app, which uses Apple’s ARKit framework, has been downloaded more than 110,000 times.

Innovative partnerships

The NFB continued to explore opportunities to partner with museums, institutions, foundations, and other organizations, both in Canada and abroad, showcasing its technical and creative expertise through innovative film and interactive experiences, many of them created for public spaces.

In 2018–2019, two inventive and popular outdoor interactive installations, made with help from high-profile partners, contributed to the Canadian public’s growing engagement with the NFB. Co-produced by the NFB, the Quartier des Spectacles Partnership, and LA SERRE–arts vivants, Wind Instrument, a bold installation by Étienne Paquette, was on display from August 16 to October 8 in front of Saint-Laurent Metro station in downtown Montreal. Written and directed by award-winning Canadian multidisciplinary artist and writer Jordan Tannahill, Draw Me Close, an immersive production blurring the worlds of live performance, virtual reality and animation, was a collaboration between the NFB and the National Theatre in the UK.

In an exciting move, the NFB also joined forces with the Quartier des Spectacles Partnership, Element AI, Google AI and the Conseil des arts de Montréal (CAM) to offer an unprecedented research and creation residency in Montreal that merges art and artificial intelligence.

Independent and emerging filmmakers

The NFB continued to support independent and emerging filmmakers through talent development labs and initiatives (and programs such as the Filmmaker Assistance Program [FAP], Aide au cinéma indépendant [ACIC], Hothouse and the Tremplin competition1). In 2018–2019, emerging artists were responsible for 31% of the NFB works released, exceeding the NFB’s target (25%).

2018–2019 highlights include the launch of the second edition of the Déranger creative lab in Winnipeg, in collaboration with the Video Pool Media Arts Centre and On Screen Manitoba, designed for multidisciplinary artists who work in the French language and hail from Inuit, Métis and First Nations communities across the country; as well as La fin des terres (Where the Land Ends), directed by Loïc Darses, which came out of the Repêchage initiative, for which the NFB recruited three promising graduates in three different streams of UQAM’s media school to work together on their first professional film—Darses, editor Philippe Lefebvre, and cinematographer Charlotte Lacoursière, joined partway through the filming by another cinematographer, Louis Turcotte.

 

Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target2 Date to achieve target 2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
The National Film Board works reflect pan-Canadian perspectives3 Percentage of works directed by filmmakers and artists from Quebec 32%–45% March 31, 2019 44% 55% 44%
Percentage of works directed by filmmakers and artists from Ontario 14%–21% March 31, 2019 18% 12% 15%
Percentage of works directed by filmmakers and artists from the Atlantic region 11%–17% March 31, 2019 10% 9% 16%
Percentage of works directed by filmmakers and artists from the Canadian Prairies, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories 8%–15% March 31, 2019 10% 10% 10%
Percentage of works directed by filmmakers and artists from British Columbia and the Yukon 11%–21% March 31, 2019 18% 14% 15%
The National Film Board is a global centre of excellence in audiovisual production Number of awards won at festivals/award ceremonies 100 March 31, 2019 124 154 141
The NFB supports Canadian industry talent and cultural diversity Percentage of completed productions directed by emerging filmmakers and artists 25% March 31, 2019 31% 40% 49%
Percentage of completed productions directed by Indigenous filmmakers and artists 15% March 31, 2020 10% 14% 11%
Percentage of completed productions directed by women
4
50% March 31, 2019 34% 42% 44%

 

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
40,034,195 40,034,195 41,578,754 36,565,509 (3,468,686)

 

The amounts in the 2018–2019 Main Estimates, Planned Spending and Authorities Available for Use categories include $12 million in financing for the relocation of NFB headquarters in Montreal; an amount of $4.5 million was postponed until fall 2019 due to construction delays. Actual spending for 2018–2019 was $6.4 million, while planned spending was $12 million; the remaining amount will be spent in 2019–2020.

The decrease in spending in Audiovisual Programming and Production in the amount of $3.5 million is mainly due to the delayed move of the Montreal headquarters.

 

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
164 154 (10)

 

The variance can be explained by a change in the number of temporary audiovisual-production employees is calculated, historically based on headcounts versus full-time equivalents. The 2018–2019 planned numbers, if restated, would be in line with the 2018–2019 actuals, at 154 full-time equivalents.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the National Film Board’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

 

Core Responsibilities

Content Accessibility and Audience Engagement

Description

The National Film Board strives to ensure that Canadians from all regions have access to its works across a range of formats. Understanding audiences and their consumption habits, making content available on a variety of platforms, and calling attention to National Film Board productions are thus intrinsic to the organization’s mandate. The National Film Board has a rich collection of over 13,000 titles that constitutes an essential component of Canada’s cultural heritage. Preserving these works for the enjoyment of Canadians and people around the world, both today and in the future, falls under the mandate conferred to the National Film Board under the National Film Act.

Results

In keeping with its mandate as public distributor of Canadian content, the NFB’s distribution, audience engagement, promotional and outreach activities—like all of its programming activities—focused on reaching wider audiences in 2018–2019. Here’s a summary of key achievements for the year.

Reaching larger audiences

2018–2019 was a remarkable year: NFB productions garnered close to 74 million views5 in Canada and internationally, surpassing the 68 million views received in 2017–2018. Overall online views (a category that includes NFB Player, interactive productions, and online partners) totalled 48.1 million, a 5% increase over 2017–2018. The NFB continued to adopt new distribution and marketing strategies, for instance by making some films available on online platforms (NFB.ca/ONF.ca, YouTube, Facebook) in the shortest timeframe possible after their festival screenings or theatrical releases. The results were promising: the number of online views went up for titles that had been recently released, by 30% compared to the previous year, reaching 300,000 views on NFB.ca/ONF.ca.

For example, the Oscar®-nominated animated short Animal Behaviour, which was available for free online in Canada for two weeks prior to the Academy Awards ceremony, became one of the most-watched titles of the year, with over 30,000 views on NFB.ca. Another successful online release was Pauline Julien, intime et politique (Pauline Julien, Intimate and Political), which was made available free of charge at NFB.ca on November 5, only a few weeks after its worldwide release, and two days after its initial broadcast on ICI ARTV. The film was shared 400 times on Facebook.

In addition, two projects were launched primarily for online audiences: the five films comprising the third edition of the Projet 5 courts (5 Shorts Project), which generated more than 100,000 views, and the nine-part docudrama True North: Inside the Rise of Toronto Basketball, which contributed greatly to the increase in YouTube views by Canadians, receiving a total of 140,000 views.

The NFB was also especially active on YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, engaging in direct conversations with users and sparking discussions through its works. As a result, there was a 60% increase in both the number of impressions (13 million) and engagement actions (121,000) among NFB audiences on Twitter, and the number of Instagram followers doubled compared to the previous year (reaching 11,000 by the end of 2018–2019). On Facebook alone, NFB.ca/ONF.ca pages solicited more than 4 million engagements (comments, shares, likes, clicks).

NFB Education

The most significant event for NFB Education was the launch of the innovative educational project Ocean School on October 4, 2018. Founded by NFB and Dalhousie University, Ocean School operates in partnership with Ingenium – Canada’s Museum of Science and Innovation and, within Dalhousie, under the auspices of the Ocean Frontier Institute, as well as the support of other partners including Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Nova Scotia Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. This NFB flagship product is a groundbreaking online educational resource and an early milestone in the NFB’s new educational offer. It uses leading educational technologies and compelling storytelling techniques to immerse youth in the world of ocean science and culture. Ocean School already boasts almost 100,000 online sessions in 2018–2019, and it received a 2019 Numix award in the Interactive Production – Youth category.

The NFB also continued to develop the other parts of its educational offer aimed at teachers and students. Efforts primarily focused on two new online digital-learning programs: Media School and The Learning Lodge (formerly called Indigenous Voices and Reconciliation).

Other audience-development activities

The NFB engages with Canadians in a variety of ways, not only through NFB.ca and digital, partner platforms, but also by strengthening its presence on more traditional platforms and venues, such as television broadcasts, theatres, festivals, public screenings, museums, and schools. In 2018–2019, public screenings received close to 600,000 views, while public installations attracted 463,000 views. The organization also saw a substantial growth in the number of television views in Canada, with totalled 18.8 million, or an increase of 45.6% over the previous year.

Planning the relocation of the NFB’s conservation rooms

The NFB actively digitizes and restores its works to guarantee their accessibility, and as set out in its Technology Plan, it completed the digitization of its active film collection in 2018–2019, just in time for the relocation of its head office.

The conservation room that houses the NFB’s visual archives—as well as its digitization and conservation activities—will be relocated in tandem with the move of the head office, although not to Îlot Balmoral. In 2018–2019, the NFB worked with Public Services and Procurement Canada to select the location of the NFB’s new conservation room (Cousens Street, in the Montreal borough of Saint-Laurent) and the construction company that will be in charge of building it (the Montoni Group).

 

Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target6 Date to achieve target 2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
The NFB works are accessible on digital platforms Number of titles offered online 4,200 March 31, 2019 4,368 4,182 3,724
The NFB works are viewed around the world Number of views of NFB works 56,000,000 March 31, 2019 73,711,564 68,053,296 53,920,167
Percentage of Canadians who confirm having watched a NFB production in the last year 20% March 31, 2019 20% 20% 20%
The NFB forges relationships with its online audiences Number of interactions between the NFB and its online audiences 11,500,000 March 31, 2019 12,501,527 n/a
(First year of results available in 2018-19)
n/a
(First year of results available in 2018-19)
The NFB works are conserved and their longevity assured for future generations Percentage of digitized works in the active collection 95% March 31, 2019 99.9%7 92% 84%
Percentage of digitized works in the total collection 60% March 31, 2019 73%8 66% 51%

 

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
23,403,744 23,403,744 24,570,830 22,534,475 (869,269)

 

The difference between actual and planned spending is the result of several factors, including:

- the carrying forward of expenses related to the NFB’s move to the following year;

- retroactive compensation resulting from wage indexations set out in the collective agreements and pay equity initiative.

 

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
172 170 (2)

 

The variance can be explained by a change in the number of temporary audiovisual-production employees is calculated, historically based on headcounts versus full-time equivalents.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the National Film Board’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

 

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

  • Acquisition Management Services
  • Communications Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Legal Services
  • Materiel Management Services
  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Real Property Management Services

Results

The long-anticipated relocation of its head office to Îlot Balmoral, located in the heart of Montreal’s Quartier des Spectacles, is one of the key components of the NFB’s ongoing transformation. 2018–2019 saw a good deal of planning for the move; construction of the building continued and the staff move is now scheduled for fall 2019. Below are highlights of the status of major organizational-development projects that have been in progress for the past few years and will remain priorities in 2019–2020.

An organization with an eye to the future

The NFB continued to implement its multi-year workplace-transformation initiative, In It Together. Multidisciplinary teams worked on providing recommendations and solutions to specific change-management issues in relation to the move. Three initiatives were launched in 2018–2019: Mosaïk, a newsletter made by and for NFB employees that aims to reflect their diverse experiences, interests, and opinions; Project Hive, a project-management platform and tool for staff; and Paperlite, which seeks to raise employee awareness about the reduction or elimination of paper documents in the workplace. Also to support change management, the NFB developed an internal communications strategy that includes updating staff at monthly presentations dubbed “Balmoral Tuesdays” and publishing a regular e-newsletter that addresses move-related topics and questions.

Diversity and inclusion: an integral part of the NFB’s DNA

The organization continued to carry out the many initiatives it has undertaken to support diversity and inclusion. Key results include achieving its gender-parity commitments—more specifically, its goals with regard to the number of productions directed by women and the percentage of the production budget allocated to women creators—and coming close to achieving production targets set out in its 2017–2020 Indigenous Action Plan.

Indeed, 34% of NFB works produced in 2018–2019 were directed by women, and 44% of the NFB’s production spending was allocated to works directed by women. The number of Indigenous-directed NFB projects in development or production increased from 30 in 2017–2018 to 40 in 2018–2019. These projects represented 15% of overall NFB production spending; thus, the NFB delivered on the key commitment in its Indigenous Action Plan one year ahead of schedule.

Financial management transformation

In 2018–2019, the migration of the NFB’s financial and physical resource-management systems to the SAP platform was the most significant achievement in terms of the modernization of the NFB’s management tools and technological infrastructure. The implementation of this system was a sizable challenge and required many changes in work methods. While employees are adjusting gradually to the new system and the new workflows associated with it, the benefits of the SAP platform are already tangible: it has improved the NFB’s overall financial management processes, reduced its paper waste, and contributed to the organization’s transition to a fully digital workplace.

 

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2018–19
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
11,130,139 11,130,139 12,626,115 11,831,372 701,233

 

Actual spending expenditures are higher than planned results, due to:

  • the timing of the migration of the NFB’s financial and material resource-management systems to the SAP platform ($1.4 million), which was completed in the first quarter of 2018–2019.

 

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19
Planned full-time equivalents
2018–19
Actual full-time equivalents
2018–19
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
69 75 6

Additional resources for Internal Services have been dedicated to several projects:

  • the coordination of the NFB’s organizational transformation;
  • the implementation of the new SAP financial and material resource-management system and changes to satellite information systems;
  • a review of administrative processes to improve the organization’s compliance with government policies and directives.

 

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph

[D]

Total spending pertains to expenditures incurred by the NFB in relation to all funding authorities approved during the fiscal year. Funding authorities include all Parliamentary appropriations: Main Estimates, Supplementary Estimates and Treasury Board Vote transfers (including the operating budget carry-forward).

 

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19
Main Estimates
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2020–21
Planned spending
2018–19
Total authorities available for use
2018–19
Actual spending (authorities used)
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016–17
Actual spending (authorities used)
Audiovisual Programming and Production 40,034,195 40,034,195 36,180,493 32,845,795 41,578,754 36,565,509 31,969,280 32,281,971
Content Accessibility and Audience Engagement 23,403,744 23,403,744 22,038,208 20,180,774 24,570,830 22,534,475 23,644,604 20,736,550
Subtotal 63,437,939 63,437,939 58,218,701 53,026,569 66,149,585 59,099,984 55,613,884 53,018,521
Internal Services 11,130,139 11,130,139 10,152,081 9,543,958 12,626,115 11,831,372 11,732,593 10,136,012
Total 74,568,078 74,568,078 68,370,782 62,570,527 78,775,700 70,931,356 67,346,477 63,154,533

 

The 2018–2019 Main Estimates, Planned Spending and Authorities Available for Use figures include $12 million in financing for the relocation of NFB headquarters in Montreal. As the move was delayed to fall 2019, part of the amount granted ($4.6 million) will be carried over to the following fiscal year. Financing for the head office move in Montreal breaks down as follows: $400,000 in 2015–2016, $2 million in 2014–2015, $7.4 million in 2018–2019 and $4.6 million in 2019–2020, for a total of $14.4 million. The Main Estimates will then be reduced by $1.2 million per year for 12 years, starting in 2020–2021.

Actual spending for 2018–2019 totals $70.9 million, an increase of $3.6 million from the prior year. This increase is mainly due to the headquarters relocation project. Actual spending for internal services includes the migration of NFB’s financial and material resource-management systems to the SAP platform, which started in 2017–2018.

Additional funds were allocated by Parliament to support audiovisual production, audience development, and digitization of the heritage collection ($1.5 million in 2016–2017 and $3.0 million starting in 2017–2018). Content accessibility and audience engagement expenditures include the purchase of digitization equipment for the heritage collection in the amount $0.9 million. The 2016–2017 Audiovisual Programming and Production figure includes $1 million for the move of the NFB Toronto office.

 

Actual human resources

 

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full time equivalents)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2016–17
Actual fulltime equivalents
2017–18
Actual fulltime equivalents
2018–19
Planned fulltime equivalents
2018–19
Actual fulltime equivalents
2019–20
Planned fulltime equivalents
2020–21
Planned fulltime equivalents
Audiovisual Programming and Production 164 151 164 154 154 154
Content Accessibility and Audience Engagement 168 169 172 170 167 167
Subtotal 332 320 336 324 321 321
Internal Services 64 69 69 75 67 67
Total 396 389 405 399 388 388

 

The number of actual full-time equivalents in 2018–2019 (399) is higher than the previous year (389). The extra resources are mainly in support of audiovisual programming and production, as well as internal services.

Additional resources required for internal services for 2017–2018 and 2018–2019 were allocated to coordinate the NFB’s organizational transformation, implement the new SAP financial and material resource-management system and make changes to satellite information systems, and review administrative processes to improve the organization’s compliance with government policies and directives.

A change in the way the number of temporary audiovisual-production employees is calculated, historically based on headcount versus full-time equivalent, was implemented in the 2017–2018 Departmental Results Report. The 2018–2019 planned numbers, if restated, would be in line with the 2018–2019 Actuals, at 154 full-time equivalents.

 

Expenditures by vote

For information on the NFB’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2018-2019.

 

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the NFB’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

 

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The National Film Board’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the NFB’s website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018–19
Planned results
2018–19
Actual results
2017–18
Actual results
Difference
(2018–19
Actual results minus
2018–19
Planned results)
Difference
(2018–19
Actual results minus
2017–18
Actual results)
Total expenses 71,158,000 71,250,000 72,580,000 92,000 (1,330,000)
Total revenues 5,477,000 4,188,000 7,626,000 (1,289,000) (3,438,000)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 65,681,000 67,062,000 64,954,000 1,381,000 2,108,000

 

Revenues

Realized revenues in 2018–2019 decreased in comparison to planned and previous year results, primarily due to lower partnership revenue.

Expenses

Expenses are presented on an accrual accounting basis.

The difference between 2018–2019 actual results and 2017–2018 actual results is due primarily to the following factors:

  • lower expenses related to lower external revenues from new partnership agreements;
  • an increase in expenses due to current-year salary revisions;
  • finalizing of the financial and material resource-management systems migration to the SAP platform.

 

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018-19 2017-18 Difference
(2018–19 minus 2017–19)
Total net liabilities 18,972,000 17,485,000 1,487,000
Total net financial assets 12,520,000 12,203,000 317,000
Departmental net debt 6,452,000 5,282,000 1,170,000
Total nonfinancial assets 17,146,000 12,106,000 5,040,000
Departmental net financial position 10,694,000 6,824,000 3,870,000

 

The difference in total net liabilities between 2018–2019 and 2017–2018 is mainly due to the timing of payments for the Montreal headquarters move.

The difference in total net financial assets between 2018–2019 and 2017–2018 is mainly due to:

  • decreased receivables at year-end driven by cash receipts on partnership contracts for Institutional Programming initiatives;
  • an increase in amounts due from the consolidated funds for timing of retrieval of payments for the Montreal headquarters move.
  • The difference in total non-financial assets represents the amount of capitalization for work in progress for the relocation of NFB headquarters, as well as capitalized digital platforms development costs.
  • The departmental net financial position represents the difference between total non-financial assets and departmental net debt. The difference of $3,870,000 is mainly due to the Montreal headquarters move.

 

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Pablo Rodriguez, P.C., M.P., Minister of Canadian Heritage and Multiculturalism

Institutional head: Claude Joli-Coeur, Government Film Commissioner and Chairperson of the NFB

Ministerial portfolio: Canadian Heritage

Enabling instrument[s]: National Film Act, R.S.C., c. N-8

Year of incorporation / commencement: 1939

Other: The NFB Board of Trustees is composed of eight members: the Government Film Commissioner, who acts as the Board’s chairperson, the Executive Director of Telefilm Canada (ex-officio member) and six other members appointed by the Governor in Council. With the exception of the Commissioner and Executive Director of Telefilm Canada, Board members serve three-year terms. The Board’s primary role is to define the NFB’s broad strategic directions and monitor its results. It approves its strategic plans and budgets, among other items.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on the NFB’s website.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see theMinister’s mandate letter.

Operating context and key risks

Information on operating context and key risks is available on the NFB’s website.

Reporting framework

The National Film Board’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below.

Graphical presentation of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory

[D]

Graphical presentation of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory

 

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for the National Film Board’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

 

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the NFB’s website:

  • Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy
  • Gender-based analysis plus

 

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

 

Organizational contact information

National Film Board of Canada

P.O. BOX 6100

Centre-ville Branch

Montreal, QC

H3A 2H7

Strategic Planning and Government relations

reports@onf-nfb.gc.ca

Websites

www.nfb.ca

www.onf-nfb.gc.ca

Social media

https://www.facebook.com/nfb.ca

http://www.twitter.com/thenfb/

https://vimeo.com/thenfb

https://www.youtube.com/user/nfb

https://www.instagram.com/onf_nfb/

 

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)

Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)

Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.

Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)

An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.

Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)

A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.

Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)

A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.

Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)

A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.

Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)

Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.

Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)

A report on an appropriated department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.

experimentation (expérimentation)

Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.

full time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)

A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person year charge against a departmental budget. Full time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.

gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])

An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.

government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)

For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government;  A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada’s Strength; and Security and Opportunity.

horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)

An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.

non budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)

Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.

performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.

performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)

A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.

performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)

The process of communicating evidence based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.

plan (plan)

The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.

planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

priority (priorité)

A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.

program (programme)

Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.

result (résultat)

An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.

statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)

Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.

Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)

A long term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.

target (cible)

A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.

voted expenditures (dépenses votées)

Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

 

Endnotes

1 – More information on the NFB’s filmmaker support programs is available on the NFB’s Website: http://onf-nfb.gc.ca/en/produce-with-the-nfb/filmmaker-support-programs/

2 – The established targets under the Audiovisual Programming and Production core responsibility are a combination of ranges and minimums. The targets for the five indicators measuring the departmental result “National Film Board works reflect pan-Canadian perspectives” are expressed in ranges. The targets measuring the remaining two departmental results, “The National Film Board is a global centre of excellence in audiovisual production” and “The NFB supports Canadian industry talent and cultural diversity,” are minimums. Results must be equal to or exceed the target levels to be met.

3 – The indicators do not distinguish between formats of works (short, medium-length, feature-length). The percent values are therefore representative of the total number of works, not the proportion of resources spent per region. For example, the percentage of works directed by filmmakers and artists from Quebec stands between 32% and 45%, even though Quebec productions account for 30% of the total production budget. It should also be noted that three of the NFB’s four national studios (English Animation, French Animation and French Interactive) are based in Quebec and attract creators from all across the country.

4 – This performance indicator measures works completed in 2018–2019. For reference, 48% of NFB works in progress in March 2019 were directed by women (38% were directed by men and 14% by mixed teams), and in 2018–2019, 44% of the NFB’s production spending was allocated to works directed by women (35% went to works directed by men and 21% to works directed by mixed teams).

5 – The total number of views of NFB productions is calculated by adding the number of views from all the various access channels offered to the public. Industry standards are applied to the measurement of views, such as Nielsen ratings and Numeris data tracking for TV views and minimum duration or completion percentage for online videos, etc.).

6 – All of the established targets under the “Content Accessibility and Audience Engagement” core responsibility are minimums. Results must be equal to or exceed the target levels to be met.

7 – The results for this target for fiscal year 2017–2018 and earlier were calculated on the basis of a different total collection size from the one that will be used starting in fiscal year 2018–2019 (the first year for the implementation of this new target). Specifically, following the implementation of the Media Asset Management system, the database for the total collection of NFB works was updated at the start of fiscal year 2018–2019, and it now comprises 14,250 works. The past results were calculated on the basis of a total collection of 13,000 works.

8 – The results for this target for fiscal year 2017–2018 and earlier were calculated on the basis of a different total collection size from the one that will be used starting in fiscal year 2018–2019 (the first year for the implementation of this new target). Specifically, following the implementation of the Media Asset Management system, the database for the active collection of NFB works was updated at the start of fiscal year 2018–2019, and it now comprises 8,550 works. The past results were calculated on the basis of an active collection of 7,800 works.