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Women in the '40s and '50s

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A collection of eight films produced in the 1940s and 1950s embodying the prevalent social perceptions of women in this period. Titles include: How They Saw Us: Women at War (1942): This British film accepts women's participation in the war effort as a natural outgrowth of their peacetime pursuits (10 min. 23 sec.); How They Saw Us: Wings on Her Shoulder (1943): A recruitment film in which the main message is that women fulfill support positions "so that men might fly" (11 min. 7 sec.); How They Saw Us: Proudly She Marches (1943): A recruitment film that extols the armed services while implying that these jobs are temporary and unnatural for women (18 min. 27 sec.); How They Saw Us: Careers and Cradles (1947): This film tries to show that women have achieved equality (11 min. 7 sec.); How They Saw Us: Women at Work (1958): This film elevates menial jobs done by women to the status of career (12 min. 5 sec.); How They Saw Us: Service in the Sky (1957): While glamorizing a service-sector job, this film also suggests marriage as the natural end of a woman's working life (9 min. 48 sec.); How They Saw Us: Needles and Pins (1955): In this story of a factory seamstress, a brief moment of glamor is substituted for genuine job satisfaction (10 min. 55 sec.); and How They Saw Us: Is It a Woman's World? (1956): This film embodies the myth that women use sex and marriage to manipulate men (29 min. 20 sec.).

1987, 108 min 36 s

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