Our Collection

Daughters of the Country Series

Top of page

The four dramas that make up this series re-open the history books to document the evolution of the Métis people. The marriages between Indian women and European fur traders fostered the exchange of customs and technologies. What evolved was a unique community where the social and economic roles of women were curcial to survival. The remarkable and indomitable spirits of these women are captured in the stories that comprise Daughters of the Country 1 and 2. Ikwe: In 1770, a young Ojibway woman marries a Scottish fur trader. The union promises prosperity for her tribe, but hardship for Ikwe (57 min.). Mistress Madeleine: In the 1850s, a Métis woman is torn between loyalty to her people and loyalty to her "husband," a Hudson's Bay clerk. Her life is shattered when he returns from England with a legal wife (57 min. 1 sec.). Places Not Our Own: By 1929, the Métis had become a forgotten people, relegated to eking out a living as best they could. Rose L'Espérance is determined that her children will have a better life (57 min. 10 sec.). The Wake: Set in contemporary Alberta, this is the story of a love affair between a Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer and a feisty Métis woman. Their lives are changed by the death of some young Métis on a frozen lake (57 min.).

1994, 229 min 02 s

Top of page

Producer's Award presented to the NFB for Daughters of the Country Series and for their efforts in behalf of Native Peoples of Canada
Annual American Indian Film Festival
November 12 to 15 1987, San Francisco - USA

Top of page