An Inuit hunter travels by snowmobile across the frozen sea. Photo taken from Stories from Our Land – Nippaq, a documentary short directed by Qajaaq Ellsworth in 2011.

Programs

Spring 2018

Come April, the NFB Film Club is sending a breath of fresh air your way with its spring 2018 lineup of films. We’ve put together six programs featuring many captivating new releases on timely topics: five programs for the general public (documentaries) and one for kids (animation and one fiction film). One of these programs is part of the screening series Aabiziingwashi (#WideAwake): NFB Indigenous Cinema on Tour, which offers films from the NFB’s exceptional collection of 250+ Indigenous-made works. Happy viewing!

Aabiziingwashi (#WideAwake): NFB Indigenous Cinema on Tour

Our People Will Be Healed, Alanis Obomsawin’s 50th film, reveals how the Cree community in Norway House, Manitoba, has been enriched through the power of education. This documentary conveys a message of hope, showing that in an appropriate school environment, one that incorporates their people’s history, language and culture, Indigenous youth can realize their dreams.

Other programs for general audiences

Attiya Khan and Lawrence Jackman’s A Better Man records a series of intimate conversations between a former couple, Steve and Attiya (the co-director), who lived through two years of domestic abuse. This gripping doc infuses new energy and possibility into the movement to end violence against women.

Niobe Thompson’s Memento mori is an evocative cinematic journey alongside the living and the dying. With remarkable access to Canada’s busiest organ-transplant hospital, the doc brings to the screen a human drama never-before captured on film. We witness one of the most profound experiences in any human life: the loss of a child, and the agonizing decision this tragedy demands.

Zaynê Akyol’s Gulîstan, Land of Roses follows the female fighters of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) as they battle for a more just democracy in the Middle East. These women are the revolutionary future of a people, and the hidden face of a highly mediatized war: the female, feminist face in the war against ISIS, the armed militants of the so-called Islamic State group.

Santiago Bertolino’s Freelancer on the Front Lines follows the journey of freelance reporter Jesse Rosenfeld through the Middle East, showing us the region’s thorny geopolitical realities and exploring how a reporter’s job has changed in the age of the Internet. From Egypt to Turkey and Iraq by way of Israel and Palestine, the documentary captures the ups and downs of an independent and unconventional kind of journalism.

Children’s program

These seven specially selected shorts (six animations and one fiction) will entertain the whole family with their fun, colourful adventures and touching stories: Eva Cvijanović’s Hedgehog’s Home and Chris Auchter’s The Mountain of SGaana (both new releases); Co Hoedeman’s Ludovic: A Crocodile in My Garden; Les Drew’s The Dingles; Sheldon Cohen’s I Want a Dog; Munro Ferguson’s How Dinosaurs Learned to Fly; and Thomas Vamos’s The Juggler.

For more details on NFB Film Club programming, and to watch clips from these films, click HERE.

Winter 2017–2018

This winter, the NFB Film Club is offering you a rich selection of both short and feature-length films, including several newly released docs. We’ve compiled six programs in all—five for a general audience and one for kids—that are sure to make viewers think and guaranteed to keep them entertained as well. Two of these programs are part of the screening series Aabiziingwashi (#WideAwake): NFB Indigenous Cinema on Tour, featuring films from the NFB’s exceptional collection of 250+ Indigenous-made works. Happy viewing!

Aabiziingwashi (#WideAwake): NFB Indigenous Cinema on Tour

In Tasha Hubbard’s Birth of a Family, three sisters and a brother meet together for the first time. Removed from their young Dene mother’s care as part of Canada’s infamous Sixties Scoop, they were four of the 20,000 Indigenous children taken from their families. Now all in middle age, each has grown up in different circumstances, with different family cultures, different values and no shared memories.

In Finding Dawn, acclaimed Métis filmmaker Christine Welsh puts a human face on a national tragedy. Thousands of Indigenous women have gone missing or been murdered in Canada over the past 30 years. The film illustrates the deep historical, social and economic factors that contribute to the epidemic of violence against Indigenous women in this country.

Other programs for general audiences

Peter Svatek’s Theater of Lifecaptures the remarkable story of how renowned chef Massimo Bottura, joined by 60 of the world’s top chefs, transformed food destined for the dumpster into delicious and nutritious meals for Italy’s hungriest residents. A visual feast in itself, the film offers a powerful message of social justice while raising awareness about the enormous environmental impact of food waste.

John Hopkins’ Bluefin tells a tale of epic stakes set in the “tuna capital of the world.” Shot in North Lake, Prince Edward Island, the doc explores the baffling mystery of why the normally wary bluefin tuna no longer fear humans. Preceded by Justin Simms’ short HAND. LINE. COD., which follows a group of “people of the fish” in Fogo Island, traditional fishers who catch cod live, by hand—one at a time, by hook and line.

Tess Girard’s As the Crow Flies follows a young group of Royal Canadian Air Cadets throughout seven weeks at an elite flight-training camp. Casting an especially affectionate eye on her female subjects, the film creates a unique and intimate portrait of an extraordinary, yet also very recognizable, group of 17-year-olds as they come of age.

Children’s program

Especially selected for young audiences, five animated shorts will move and entertain the whole family: Janice Nadeau’s Mamie, Janet Perlman’s Bully Dance, Pierre Sylvestre’s Cot Cot, Bertrand Langlois’ Demon and Marvels and Judith Klein’s Catuor.

For more details on NFB Film Club programming, and to watch clips from the films, click HERE.

The NFB Film Club is a turnkey initiative created specifically for public libraries. It grants free access to new and thought-provoking documentaries as well as award-winning and entertaining animation for the whole family.

For more information on the NFB Film Club, contact:

Marianne Di Domenico | 514-283-8953 | m.didomenico@nfb.ca

Fall 2017

This fall, the NFB Film Club offers you a special selection of films to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation. The fall lineup consists of seven programs, including one for children, that will take audiences on a journey from coast to coast and reveal Canada in all its beauty and diversity. Three of these programs are part of the screening series Aabiziingwashi (#WideAwake): NFB Indigenous Cinema on Tour, featuring films from the NFB’s exceptional collection of 250+ Indigenous-made works—the stories of our land, told by First Nations, Métis and Inuit filmmakers from every region of the country. Enjoy these cinematic treasures… happy viewing!

To mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation

Bill Mason’s Waterwalker follows the filmmaker and artist on his journey by canoe into the Ontario wilderness. The documentary features breathtaking visuals and exciting white-water footage, with a musical score by one of Canada’s most renowned musicians, Bruce Cockburn. Preceded by the animated short Log Driver’s Waltz by John Weldon, one of the most often-requested films in the NFB collection.

A shorts program featuring five animated, fiction and documentary films will take you on a fascinating journey across Canada: Anita Lebeau’s Big Drive (Prairies), John Howe’s Gone Curling (Saskatchewan), Colin Low’s Corral (Alberta), Donald Wilder’s Nahanni (Northwest Territories) and Bill Mason’s Song of the Paddle (Ontario).

And a rich and varied program featuring four shorts: two animated films, the Oscar®-winning Every Child by Eugene Fedorenko and the Oscar®-nominated Wild Life by Amanda Forbis and Wendy Tilby; and two documentaries about Montreal in the 1960s, William Brind’s Impressions of Expo 67 and Donald Brittain and Don Owen’s Ladies and Gentlemen… Mr. Leonard Cohen.

Aabiziingwashi (#WideAwake): NFB Indigenous Cinema on Tour

Featuring expert commentary and stunning imagery, Paul M. Rickard’s Aboriginal Architecture, Living Architecture provides a virtual tour of seven Indigenous communities—Pueblo, Mohawk, Inuit, Crow, Navajo, Coast Salish and Haida—revealing how each is actively reinterpreting and adapting traditional forms for contemporary purposes.

With The Sacred Sundance: The Transfer of a Ceremony, First Nations director Brian J. Francis journeys into the traditions of North American Indigenous spirituality. The Sundance is new to the Mi’kmaq people of Eastern Canada, brought to them from the West by elder William Nevin of the Elsipogtog First Nation. This event marks a unique transmission of traditional culture from one First Nation to another.

The Road Forward, a musical documentary by Marie Clements, is a new release available as of November 2017. It connects a pivotal moment in Canada’s civil rights history—the beginnings of Indian Nationalism in the 1930s—with the powerful momentum of First Nations activism today. Clements paints an electrifying picture of how a tiny movement, the Native Brotherhood and Native Sisterhood, became a powerful voice for social, political and legal advocacy, eventually effecting profound change at the national level.

Children’s program

Four fun and touching animated shorts for the whole family: My Grandmother Ironed the King’s Shirts and Me and My Moulton by Oscar®-winning animator Torill Kove, Ernest Reid’s The Boy Next Door and Janet Perlman’s Invasion of the Space Lobsters.

For more details on NFB Film Club programming, and to watch clips from the films, click here.

The NFB Film Club is a turnkey initiative created specifically for public libraries. It grants free access to new and thought-provoking documentaries as well as award-winning and entertaining animation for the whole family.

For more information on the NFB Film Club, contact:
Marianne Di Domenico | 514-283-8953 | m.didomenico@nfb.ca

Previous seasonal programs still available: